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By Debbie le Quesne

Posts Tagged ‘Better Care Fund

Now docs say bring forward the £700m Better Care Fund monies

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Fourteen doctors’ leaders have written to George Osborne asking for further funding for social care in next week’s Budget, the BBC has reported.

In a letter to the chancellor, they warn cuts in social care funding were putting real pressure on the NHS.

And they said investing in social care was “vital to the success of the NHS”. Err . . . yes.

The government response in the BBC report was that it was already giving local authorities access to up to £3.5bn of new funding for adult social care by 2019-20. By when? Far too late, I’m afraid.

The signatories to the letter are led by Clare Marx, president of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, and include the leaders of a number of royal medical colleges and societies.

In their letter to the Chancellor, they describe health and social care as “two sides of the same coin”.

It’s heartening that the letter describes the impact of an underfunded social care system on the NHS, saying patients fit to be discharged are unable to leave hospital because social support is unavailable at home. How long has the Association been saying this?

“This increases the likelihood of infections and falls,” the letter says.

The knock-on effect is that beds are blocked to new patients, they continue, “leading to cancelled appointments and operations”.

“This impacts on our ability to provide timely treatment and meet treatment targets, risking patient wellbeing, and is ultimately detrimental to the economy through delayed returns to work,” they wrote.

And here’s the bit I just love. In the letter, the doctors suggest bringing forward the extra £700m from the Better Care Fund to this year rather than waiting until 2017, when the money was due to be spread over three years.

NHS chief executive Simon Stevens has previously said that the success of the Five Year Forward View is dependent on adequate funding for social care.

 

The signatories to the letter are:

Miss Clare Marx, president of the Royal College of Surgeons of England

Prof Dame Sue Bailey, chairwoman of the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges

Prof John Ashton, president of the Faculty of Public Health

Dr Anna Batchelor, dean of the Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine

Dr Liam Brennan, president of the Royal College of Anaesthetists

Prof Jane Dacre, president of the Royal College of Physicians

Mr Michael Lavelle-Jones, president of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh

Dr Suzy Lishman, president of the Royal College of Pathologists

Prof Carrie MacEwen, president of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists

Dr Giles Maskell, president of the Royal College of Radiologists

Prof Neena Modi, president of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health

Prof David Oliver, president of the British Geriatrics Society

Dr David Richmond, president of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

Prof Sir Simon Wessely, president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists

Note: If this letter was on social media, I’d be adding my name to the list . . .

 

King’s Fund sound alarm over shortfall in care funding

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Budget cuts of 26 percent will threaten the sustainability of social care the Association of Directors of Adult Social Service warned.

As I have previously blogged the organisation said the results of the annual budget survey show that while spending on adult services has reduced by 12 per cent since 2010, the amount of people needing support has increased by 14 per cent.

Put simply, the figures don’t stack up and councils have had to make savings equivalent to £3.53bn. David Pearson, president of ADASS, was quoted in The Guardian as saying: “As resources reduce and need increases, directors are increasingly concerned about the impact on countless vulnerable people who will fail to receive, or not be able to afford, the social care services they need and deserve.”

The warning has drawn comments from Richard Humphries, assistant director of policy at the King’s Fund: Again quoted in the Guardian online, he says: “This survey once again highlights the enormous pressure on social care budgets.

“Despite the best efforts of local authorities, this will result in further cuts to services and fewer people receiving support.

“Worryingly, half the money being transferred from the NHS budget to support better joint working between health and social care is now being spent on protecting social care services from budget cuts, rather than driving integrated care and other service changes needed to better meet the needs of patients and service-users.”

I would dearly like to bring some positive, creative solution to this ongoing debate, but frankly like so many in the care sector, my day of making savings through working smarter is nearly through. Everyone I know has cut, restructured, re-invented and re-thought the way they work to deliver more efficient care. There has to come an end – it’s an inevitable economic principle – when the wheels will finally drop off social care machine.

The King’s Fund embraces some of the finest minds in the country and the government would do well to heed the alarms.

The only real lifeline we have is the new Care Act and the Better Care Fund that focus resources to help manage their own care and hopefully save billions. Critically, however, we need monies to roll out the new working methodology – cash, it appears that is already spent on “protecting social care services from budget cuts.”

‘Make or break’ time looms for social care

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Councils in England face a funding gap of £5.8 billion between March 2014 and the end of 2015/16, new Local Government Association analysis shows.

The figures are scary and according to Care Industry News, the online magazine, local authorities will need to make huge savings equivalent to 12.5 per cent on their total budgets before next April.

Successful integration of health and social care is vital, says the LGA to stop the care system from collapsing.

The £5.8 billion shortfall in council budgets will be caused by a combination of reduced government funding and rising demand on services – particularly from the elderly.

The funding gap in adult social care alone already amounts to £1.9 billion by 2015/16 – based on council adult social care budgets in 2013/14, says the Care Industry News report.

My abiding fear is where new saving will be made. Already we have heard pledges to protect spending on adult social care next year as much as possible, but I can’t help worrying worse is to come.

Next April, will mark a critical point for adult social care in England with the pooling of £5.4 billion from councils and the health service. The Better Care Fund will aim to improve care for older people and reduce financial pressure on councils and the health system through stopping lengthy waits for discharge from hospitals and avoiding unnecessary admissions to care homes.

Initiatives like the Vitality Partnership are already under way to make a difference in the community and funding for such work has been assigned for the year.

But the scale of savings which need to be found next year illustrate the urgent need for the Better Care Fund to “quickly succeed in radically improving the way public money is spent on looking after England’s elderly,” says Care Industry News.

Indeed, 2015 I believe will be make or break for social care and council leaders are saying the same.

Quoted din the online article, LGA Chairman Sir Merrick Cockell says: ”In recent years, local government has worked tirelessly to save billions while protecting services for those who need them most. But the scale of the challenge facing local authorities next year is stark. Council finances are on a knife-edge and the old way of doing things – including the way we care for our elderly population – just won’t work anymore.

“Next year will be a make or break moment for adult social care, for local services provided by councils and for the NHS.”

Central to the rescue mission is the introduction of the Better Care Fund (BCF).

“Neither councils, the NHS or England’s elderly can afford for this not to work,” he adds.

And I have just returned from a meeting about the Better Caring Fund. Interesting – it seems the Government is still “deciding and discussing,” while local authorities and CCG’s are now too far down the line to stop in what seems a perfectly reasonable use of money. Spend the money to help people stay healthy in their own homes or care homes and spend a whole load less on acute hospital admissions.

More cuts to an already financially struggling industry or cutting back on the BCF would be catastrophic.  The challenge ahead is enormous and I for one have everything crossed that all will be well.