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By Debbie le Quesne

Archive for the ‘elderly care’ Category

‘Jet-in’ carers fly from Benidorm to UK amid care chaos

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I could hardly believe my eyes as I read the in the Telegraph that builders, barmaids and bankrupt businessmen are  flying into Britain from Spanish holiday spots to earn lucrative sums as care workers for the elderly.

What is going on?

A Telegraph investigation tells us that “thousands of expats are funding lifestyles in the sun by jetting in for fortnightly placements to take sole charge of the vulnerable, with, in many cases, “just a few days’ training.”

According to the story, British agencies are trawling popular resorts such as Benidorm and Malaga to lure new recruits with the promise of good earnings, free accommodation and subsidised travel.

And these travel carers are then supposed to give the most intimate of care to our elderly – virtual strangers doing shifts alongside residents with whom they have no real connection.

Figures being banded about, suggest earnings can be up to almost £1,700 a fortnight, with an alleged admission that many of those on their books “did not want to look after the vulnerable, but were driven by the cash.”

Our social care system is breaking down – a shortage of Government investment that’s matched by a growing shortage of workers.

Is this the latest symptom of chaos? Indeed, I believe it is, along with the widespread care home and dom-care service closures and record levels of bed-blocking in hospitals for want of social care packages being in place.

Caroline Abrahams, charity director at Age UK, is reported as saying the revelations were “yet another symptom of a crisis in social care” and I agree.

The Telegraph investigation reveals that “former builders, barmaids and taxi drivers are among thousands of expats flying back to Britain each month to be responsible for elderly people, those with dementia and learning difficulties.”

I am assaulted by a multitude of emotions at this news . . . I’m angry, frustrated, overwhelmed, but mostly sad.

Clearly driven by the downturn in the Spanish economy, we now have the added danger of casual carers – not to be confused by the many other foreign care workers who have chosen to make a career in caring in the UK.

It will be interesting to see what the CQC has to say about this latest trend, which according to the Telegraph is dodging regulation because some of the workers are self-employed.

Dr Sarah Wollaston, chairman of the Commons health select committee rightly says we need to “completely rethink the way we care for the vulnerable; we should be growing our own workforce, not relying on short-term stints from people flying in from overseas.”

I understand only too well the need to improve the supply of care workers, but this development worries me.

By 2020, a shortfall of more than 200,000 care workers is forecast in the UK.

For some, that’s a business opportunity, but if this is the emerging model we must stay vigilant.

Such a system raises obvious questions about consistency, accountability and care inquiry follow-ups – the regular dialogue between carers about patient needs and changes in condition.

I need chocolate, another coffee and the heater on my feet . . . all bad signs, I’m afraid, as a reach for crumbs of comfort.

  • Have you heard? This winter, the gaps in Britain’s stretched social care services have seen some of the most extreme measures on record.
  • Every NHS hospital has been ordered to cease most planned operations for a month until mid-January, in a desperate attempt to empty hospital beds, many of which are filled with pensioners for want of care packages at home.

 

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As the Red Cross intervene with the NHS, what will it take force a social care lifeline?

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The other Saturday I watched the television news with a stunned sense of disbelief as the chief executive of the British Red Cross announced the NHS was in the middle of a “humanitarian crisis”.

I’d never thought of the Red Cross intervening in UK affairs in such a way – don’t the images of this worthy, brave orgaisation invade our news from far flung places where there’s famine and the ravages of conflict? Not any more it seems.

To hear its top man, Mike Adamson, explaining exactly what defines a humanitarian crisis and that it’s is now in England, stopped me in my tracks.

His definition was along the lines of . . .

“It affects many people over a prolonged period of time, something of threat to their health or wellbeing. Just think about the situation of someone, for example, waiting on a trolley in and A&E department for several hours, perhaps with no family around them after a fall, probably quite frightened. . . .”

The warning came as it emerged two patients died in the same A&E department within a week during “extremely busy” periods.

In December A&E department shut their doors 140 times and now cancer ops are being cancelled, I read in the newspapers.

Mr Adamson added extra cash was needed for health and social care to make the system sustainable.

What was that? Extra cash for social care. Indeed!

Sadly, at the root of the NHS crisis is a failing social care . . . and we have warned for years that it was terribly broken. They would not listen, and I’m not convinced they are listening now.

The official response from the NHS is predictable: What crisis? And this still remains the official line.

I find it odd that hospitals like Russells Hall, Dudley, is allegedly paying a company to try to help sort out their funding, either by pressurising care homes to drop their fees, or getting patients’ families to become fiscally involved. Surely this could never catch on after the government’s stalled attempt to get the public to invest in care insurance policies. The elephant in the room, of course, is a properly functioning social care system. Everyone knows it. The government, however, steadfastly refuses to acknowledge it.

Mr Adamson explained: “The British Red Cross is on the front line, responding to the humanitarian crisis in our hospital and ambulance services across the country.

“We have been called in to support the NHS and help get people home from hospital and free up much needed beds.” Called in by whom? I suspect the Department of Health.

Shadow health secretary Jonathan Ashworth said it was “staggering” that the Red Cross had been drafted in to help. I think so too, though I would add that his Government did precious little to grasp the nettle of social care during its term.

Of course, there’s much politicking to be had over this development in the care saga so we need to focus on facts.

Just about a year ago bed blocking was costing the NHS about £820 million per year.

Last summer the National Audit Office said delays in discharging patients from hospitals in England had risen by nearly a third over two years. Delayed transfers (bed blocking) have not improved and there’s a resigned approach that’s punching through that deeply disturbs me.

Across England, the audit office found that for every 100 beds, three days of use were taken by patients who no longer needed to be in hospital between March 2015 and February 2016.

Quite what 2017 analytics will deliver terrifies me, because it is in direct correlation to the ability of social care to unblock beds – something it can no longer do. And we all know the reasons why.

The question now is this: Exactly what will it take for the Government to intervene? Will it deliver the much-needed financial lifeline to social care, which could not only rescue struggling care providers, but also our hospitals and . . . dare I say, those people who need either one or both of those services,

 

 

Autumn Statement: My utter disbelief

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Like millions of others, I listened to the Chancellor’s Autumn Statement in a stunned disbelief that after unprecedented pressure he failed to deliver on social care.

Secretly, I’d been hopeful that, as ITV put it, this vital area of funding would be Philip Hammond’s “rabbit out of the hat.”

But the man, who is privileged to represent the constituents of one of the wealthiest areas in the UK, said absolutely nothing on the issue so many of us were pinning our hopes on.

As the Prime Minister pointed out in PMQ’s, local authorities have been allowed to raise council tax by 2% to help plug the funding gap. But, especially in poorer areas where council tax receipts are low, the “social care precept” has barely touched the sides.

The irony of it all I find was in the closing comment calling it a plan that “provides help to those who need it now.”

On what plant does this Chancellor live?

It was no surprise that leader of the opposition Jeremy Corbyn chose to focus on health and social care as he took on the Prime Minister in the Commons before the Autumn Statement.

But is set a stage of clear demarcation – between reality and Cloud Cuckoo Land.

Love him or hate him, Corbyn urged the Government to plug the gap and address the “stress and fear” it causes.

Unremittingly bleak, social care providers have done an amazing job in recent years without the central funding to sustain long-term credible business models.

Local authorities have also been forced to pare provision back, to in the opinion of many, dangerous levels.

For six years there have been unprecedented cuts to LA budgets, with figures suggesting those people eligible for council-funded care falling by 25 per cent.

Teresa May’s almost apologetic herald for the mini-budget of gloom was found in her comment: “We can only afford to pay for the NHS and social care if we have a strong economy”.

My life! This is another George Osborne in this key role.

Well, Mr Hammond, may I congratulate you on your sheer brilliance in ignoring perhaps the most pressing social dilemma since the introduction of the Three-day Week in 1974.

Predictions of “looming chaos” were rejected by the Chancellor.

Philip Hammond said a previously announced NHS funding commitment was in line with what its leaders had wanted.

Health and social care leaders are reeling and unanimous in their condemnation.

Now the Treasury has made its stand, with Mr Hammond confirming that ministers would be sticking with departmental spending announced last year, the official unraveling of social care can begin.

In a new briefing published ahead of the Autumn Statement on 23 November, the Health Foundation, The King’s Fund and the Nuffield Trust analysed the state of health and social care finances, concluding that cuts and rising demand will leave adult social care facing a £1.9 billion funding gap next year.

What a cynical approach to well-founded information in the care sector we have witnessed. Is this bordering on criminal neglect . . . interesting thought.

And finally (for now): For once I am in a position to sympathise with the local authorities in the West Midlands and particularly Birmingham which is £50million in the red already this year.

No lifeline, the extra burden of the living wage  . .  and effectively an abandonment of responsibility for those in need and their care providers. In the industrial West Midlands  there simply are not enough self-funders to keep the sector afloat and bolster the care of those people funded by their local councils.

A budget for the JAM people (just about managing), Mr Hammond. Not in my world, Sir.

 

 

 

 

– Debbie LeQuesne CEO

At last, the embattled social care sector is making the headlines it needs

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Billions of pounds are needed to avoid the NHS and social care crisis – that’s the message which has been sent to Secretary of State for Health, Jeremy Hunt.

According to the Daily Mirror, leaders in the care sector have alerted Mr Hunt after three health areas revealed they face a combined shortfall of more than £2.4billion by the end of the decade

As we broke into November, the dire warning outlined that without extra money they will struggle to meet waiting time targets, provide enough hospital beds and basic levels of social care.

Sounds familiar, doesn’t it, and it’s right on our doorstep.

The Mirror reports: “The verdict is contained in the newly published Sustainability and Transformation Plans (STPs) for Birmingham and Solihull, North Central London and South West London.

Sustainability and Transformation Plans were ordered by NHS England boss Simon Stephens in December 2015 and charged 44 regions in England to come up with a five-year programme for providing health and social care in their areas.

I’m not a lover of red-top journalism, but this report is exactly what’s needed.

And it adds: “Of the three reports published so far Birmingham and Solihull warns it faces a £712million shortfall by 2020, South West London £828million and North Central London £876million.”

For the record, West Midlands Care Association is working very closely with Birmingham City Council and assessing the impact throughout the neighbouring Black Country region.

The shortfall will doubtless impact on areas already struggling like Sandwell, Walsall and Dudley.

Mark Rogers, the chief executive of Birmingham Council, says in the piece both health and social care face “huge challenges”. According to Mirror “this includes the need for at least 430 more hospital beds in the region.”

Personally, I’m struggling to find a creative way forward. All the cuts in social care have already been made and I fear the duty of care caveat is lost somewhere in the ether.

Budgets are not just shrinking, they are vanishing and the demand for care is astronomic.

Mr Hunt, I fear lives in a bubble as MP for South West Surrey, and as we all know the social care financial map is very different in his constituency.

There is a laudable push to get people out of hospital and back into their own homes with social care support. But it is catastrophically failing.

Let me quote the Mirror again: The North Central London STP says it is not “able to deliver universally for everyone to the standards we would like.

“Our analysis tells us that too many people stay longer in hospital than is medically necessary. There are challenges with meeting acute standards, as well as issues workforce sustainability.

“Some of our estates aren’t fit for purpose. Additionally, we face a financial challenge of £876million across health commissioners and providers by 20/21 if we do nothing,” the STP is reported as saying.

This could have been written of any number of LAs throughout the UK.

Chancellor Philip Hammond has a chance to help next week with his mini Budget on November 23.

In the light of bleak analysis, I truly hope he will understand his responsibilities towards care providers and those receiving care.

WE are working with Birmingham to look at the consequences for Domicilairy and Care Homes. The shortfall in Birmingham has impact on the Black Country with many people being placed in Sandwell Walsall and Dudley

‘Billions’ needed to avoid social care meltdown

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Billions of pounds are needed to avoid the NHS and social care crisis – that’s the message which has been sent to Secretary of State for Health, Jeremy Hunt.

According to the Daily Mirror, leaders in the care sector have alerted Mr Hunt after three health areas revealed they face a combined shortfall of more than £2.4billion by the end of the decade

As we broke into November, the dire warning outlined that without extra money they will struggle to meet waiting time targets, provide enough hospital beds and basic levels of social care.

Sounds familiar, doesn’t it, and it’s right on our doorstep.

The Mirror reports: “The verdict is contained in the newly published Sustainability and Transformation Plans (STPs) for Birmingham and Solihull, North Central London and South West London.

Sustainability and Transformation Plans were ordered by NHS England boss Simon Stephens in December 2015 and charged 44 regions in England to come up with a five-year programme for providing health and social care in their areas.

I’m not a lover of red-top journalism, but this report is exactly what’s needed.

And it adds: “Of the three reports published so far Birmingham and Solihull warns it faces a £712million shortfall by 2020, South West London £828million and North Central London £876million.”

For the record, West Midlands Care Association is working very closely with Birmingham City Council and assessing the impact throughout the neighbouring Black Country region.

The shortfall will doubtless impact on areas already struggling like Sandwell, Walsall and Dudley.

Mark Rogers, the chief executive of Birmingham Council, says in the piece both health and social care face “huge challenges”. According to Mirror “this includes the need for at least 430 more hospital beds in the region.”

Personally, I’m struggling to find a creative way forward. All the cuts in social care have already been made and I fear the duty of care caveat is lost somewhere in the ether.

Budgets are not just shrinking, they are vanishing and the demand for care is astronomic.

Mr Hunt, I fear lives in a bubble as MP for South West Surrey, and as we all know the social care financial map is very different in his constituency.

There is a laudable push to get people out of hospital and back into their own homes with social care support. But it is catastrophically failing.

Let me quote the Mirror again: The North Central London STP says it is not “able to deliver universally for everyone to the standards we would like.

“Our analysis tells us that too many people stay longer in hospital than is medically necessary. There are challenges with meeting acute standards, as well as issues workforce sustainability.

“Some of our estates aren’t fit for purpose. Additionally, we face a financial challenge of £876million across health commissioners and providers by 20/21 if we do nothing,” the STP is reported as saying.

This could have been written of any number of LAs throughout the UK.

Chancellor Philip Hammond has a chance to help next week with his mini Budget on November 23.

In the light of bleak analysis, I truly hope he will understand his responsibilities towards care providers and those receiving care.

WE are working with Birmingham to look at the consequences for Domicilairy and Care Homes. The shortfall in Birmingham has impact on the Black Country with many people being placed in Sandwell Walsall and Dudley

Dementia now the leading cause of death

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It’s a subject close to my heart, and after nursing both parents who suffered with dementia I’m not surprised to hear the memory-loss condition, including Alzheimer’s disease, has overtaken heart disease as the leading cause of death in England and Wales.

Last year, more than 61,000 people died of dementia – 11.6 per cent of all recorded deaths.

The Office for National Statistics says the change is largely due to an ageing population.

People are living for longer and deaths from some other causes, including heart disease, have gone down.

And of course, doctors are now much better at diagnosing dementia and the condition is now given more weight on death certificates.

The majority of beds now taken in our nursing homes are for those with some form of dementia, though this may not be the primary condition.

Hilary Evans of Alzheimer’s Research UK was reported in the Press as saying: “These figures once again call attention to the uncomfortable reality that currently, no-one survives a diagnosis of dementia.

“Dementia is not an inevitable part of ageing, it’s caused by diseases that can be fought through research, and we must bring all our efforts to bear on what is now our greatest medical challenge.”

Martina Kane of the Alzheimer’s Society said: “It is essential that people have access to the right support and services to help them live well with dementia and that research into better care, treatments and eventually a cure remain high on the agenda.”

There are around 850,000 people living with dementia in the UK.

My question to those who hold the purse strings for social care: How are we expected to care for them correctly without more money coming our way?

Vanity projects have been the hallmark of many governments. The breaking of the miners’ union under Mrs Thatcher, the Millennium Dome, Heathrow’s new runway expansion, Trident and not least HS2, have all be cited as political legacy monuments.

But let’s get something clear here. The West Midlands Care Association is not, to use a term, “a political animal” and we’ll work with whatever party to enhance the delivery of social care. Truth is, however, every political persuasion has a desire to leave it’s mark, but perhaps now is a time to fix sights on a massive national problem – the state of social care.

The government currently says HS2 will cost £55.7 billion. In 2010 the original estimates were put at £32bn.

A foolish thought, I know, but shouldn’t we be shelving this scheme and diverting the money into resolving the care crisis that has gripped the nation?

That way, those locked into the distressing and surreal battle with dementia could be properly cared for. Have I got the social and economic values all so wrong? Clearly, things are never so simplistic, but at this time it appears a pretty good option to me.

We need to stop thinking about the expressions of dementia – it’s a condition that can be frightening to both carer and patient, it can be hard to be around it, it can be violent and it can destroy those who are simply under-gunned in the fight to deliver compassionate care.

Perhaps our MPs will note that all care needs to be respectful, but it costs and funding needs to come from somewhere. Also, perhaps they could take on board that the dementia drain on diminishing social care funds is for a people group which never chose to be such a burden on society.

The Association is acutely aware of the growing workload for dementia care and the social skills it needs.

Last month (October) – Dementia Month – we worked with all of our care providers and the Aged Care Channel TV (ACCTV) to get additional training to the carers.

Pressure mounts on Chancellor for more cash

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Last month Theresa May’s claims that the government is putting £10bn extra into health was challenged by five MPs. led by the Conservative Dr Sarah Wollaston, the chair of the Commons health select committee.

The impact of not enough money for hospitals and access to social care are written for all to see in rising demand for A&E and missed waiting time targets.

Clearly there are complex reasons that, according to some sources, delayed transfer of care lost 192,000 hospital bed days. But the downgrading of social care in government agendas must be a primary cause.

I am led to understand some NHS number-crunchers believe the real number of people in hospital who should be being cared for in the community is probably four times as many as represented the figures here.

The pressure really is on Mr Hammond to deliver in his Autumn Statement.

Rising costs, the ageing population, difficulties recruiting staff and years of central government reducing its grant have left the service in crisis, the Local Government Association claims.

Surely, there is an unprecedented agreement that social care should be at the very top of the list of Mr Hammond’s priorities for urgent extra funding.

The triple whammy of shrinking budgets, rising demand and the cost of paying the national living wage to care workers has left many councils paring back more and more on care costs.

I’m led to believe that in Walsall last week there were 138 people waiting to leave hospital. There is enough capacity in the region to take them all, but . . . there is not the money to start the funding of new packages.

Before winter pressures kick in we understand discharge managers are looking to get all those people back in the community and free  100 beds for winter. Sadly, if all of those perceived admissions required care in the community or step-down residential beds we’re in trouble. There simply is not the capacity.

Mr Hammond is being urged by senior Tories to give the crumbling care system a double boost in his autumn statement, amid growing alarm that social care and the NHS will be unable to cope with demand this winter.

Rumours suggest that Mr Hammond is examining a plan to plough between £700m and £1.5bn extra into social care services from April to help reduce numbers of older people being admitted to hospital.

Apparently, he is also considering letting councils raise the amount they can add to council tax bills to fund social care through a precept introduced in April, currently capped at two percent.

We’ll see . . .

The LGA has made known that years of cuts to town-hall budgets have left the sector in crisis, with fewer people getting help with basics such as washing and eating at a time when need is rising.

Also, care homes are closing, partly because councils cannot afford high enough fees to allow operators – whose costs have risen because of the national living wage – to make a profit.

Putting further funds into social care, will I’m sure, indirectly relieve some of the difficulties being encountered by the NHS; not lest helping to facilitate a more efficient discharge of patients.