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By Debbie le Quesne

Archive for the ‘care for disabled’ Category

Council leaders call for more investment in social care

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I’m cautiously hopeful that the Daily Mail may be onside with out campaign for more social care funding.

Recently I stumbled across a story where Local Government Association (LGA) were warning  that money is being diverted away from road repairs, leisure centres and local bus routes in order to maintain the struggling social care sector. Really!

Propping up funding caps in care can seriously damage your car or compromise public travel seems to be the message here, but the message hopefully will help our cause.

The LGA also reported that the current funding gap in the social care system is hampering councils’ ability to support the nation’s most vulnerable adults.

This is good for us, isn’t it?

The LGA said that councils spend around 35 per cent of their budgets on adult social care and increasingly have to divert money away from other services to plug gaps.

Adult social care services face a potential funding gap of at least £2.6 billion, according to a new report from the LGA.

The news broke as charity Leonard Cheshire warned that as a result to cuts in care, many people are left without the help they need or are being left trapped in their homes for “days on end without vital support and human contact”.

Leonard Cheshire’s chief executive Neil Heslop was reported as saying: “It is a national scandal that thousands of disabled and older people do not have the support to do everyday tasks such as washing and dressing, and even more shockingly, no support to eat.

In the foreword to the new LGA report, Councillor Izzi Seccombe, chairwoman of the LGA’s community wellbeing board, says: “For too long the service has too often been seen by decision-makers as an adjunct to the NHS, rather than a service of equal importance.

“A lack of recognition in terms of profile has combined with a lack of recognition in terms of funding to place our care and support system under enormous pressure.

“The situation now is critical and it is no exaggeration to say that our care and support system is in crisis.”

It’s interesting to note too that the LGA is saying that councils have long argued it is a false economy to pump money into the NHS but leave social care so chronically underfunded.

Locally, a West Midlands Care Association survey of those providing residential care brought the crisis into pin-sharp focus when 50 per cent of those polled warned they could face closure or have to sell if things didn’t improve.

The Mail also quoted The King’s Fund as saying spending cuts have left social care in a “perilous state”.

Not a single provider wants to read this kind of news, but it seems to have taken us six years to get to the point of having the Press onside.

There ought to be a public outcry and if this were happing in France or Italy, I’m sure there would be. But we’re all so British – measured and at times frustratingly dispassionate as we ‘get the job done’.

It may be premature to thank the media for . . . eventually . . . responding to our plight.

Please keep it up Daily Mail. We need all the help we can muster to survive this care crisis, and critically, so do our elderly, frail, disabled and marginalised.

 

How social care takes the lead in prevention

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If anyone should ever doubt the value of social care, I suggest they read an online article in Care Talk by Debbie Sorkin, whom I met recently at a Care Alliance meeting in London.

Her theme is simple – prevention is better than cure. Always better.

It is, as she points out, the cornerstone of recent health and social care policy. This is all about keeping people healthy and independent in their own homes – a “defining principle of the 2014 Care Act.”

She makes the point that “It means encouraging people to take more control of their own health and wellbeing: a move that is being supported, if slowly and patchily, through the introduction of Personal Health Budgets.”

But it’s also about supporting people, whether in their own homes or in residential care.

A great concept, this initiative is a pillar of NHS England’s Five Year Forward View – but, as Sorkin says “it should be clear that it’s also been the settled practice of social care for many years.”

But there is a problem. If we want preventative care (and we do). if we want to keep the elderly and frail out of A&E departments, if we want them healthy in body and mind . . . it costs money.

While I applaud Sorkin’s positive approach, she does point to a major cloud of foreboding.

She says: “ . . . Keeping people well, or nipping problems in the bud – is getting harder to do, particularly in relation to older people, where the social care system is struggling to cope.”

Let me quote a little more from her feature: “Six consecutive years of local authority budget cuts have seen 26 per cent fewer people getting help, and no-one has a full picture of what has happened to those older people – around a million strong according to Care UK – who are no longer entitled to publicly funded care. The human and financial costs to them and those who care for them are mounting.”

On the issue of district nurses providing community-based health services that are essential to keeping people with chronic, complex conditions well enough to live independently –there was a 28 per cent reduction in their numbers between 2009 and 2014, despite increased demands.

Sorkin begs the question what our response should be and points to leadership, well, system leadership (new sound bite) as an answer.

She mentions “doing what you can with the resources available.” What resources. Have my members any left?

She also promotes the Leadership Qualities Framework (LQF) for Adult Social Care “central to the section on Managing Resources, using resources effectively and minimising waste.”

All the right words and phrases are there . . . innovation, encouraging improvement, and creating a climate of continuous service.

Successful examples are cited in the West Midlands: New Outlook, a small care provider, teaming up with Nehemiah Housing Association to place a greater emphasis on wellbeing amongst residents and service users.

Results, she says, for the programme that has been running for only about a year, show emergency ambulance calls from the sites where the programme is operating dropped by 66 per cent between 2014 and 2015.

I don’t doubt good practice will always turn in good results and that Sorkin is right to point out the benefits of such management programmes. See http://www.caretalk.co.uk/how-social-care-takes-the-lead-in-prevention/ for the full list of improvements.

But for many care providers they’re well passed this rescue point. As someone said: “You can’t use an umbrella in a typhoon.”

Great leadership, hard choices, programmes of smart thinking, so many of my members have been there, done that, got the T-shirt and are still drowning.

Ultimately, all business needs the oil of finance – proper, fair rates for a proper job. Local authorities don’t want to, or can’t pay it; in many of the poorer areas (like mine) self-funders are thin on the ground and without the necessary viscosity of money the engines of care seize.

 

 

Care cuts ‘leave frail elderly fending for themselves’

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Frail old people in England are being left to fend for themselves because government-funded care is being scaled back, a review suggests.

That’s the news that recently greeted me care of the BBC.

The number of over-65s being helped by councils had fallen by a quarter in the four years to 2014, the joint King’s Fund and Nuffield Trust report claims.

Wait a minute, I’ve already read this report, I thought. But then I became aware that because of the information overload, I’d missed this crucial point.

Despite more people needing help because of the ageing population, we’re helping less and less it seems.

The BBC assured that Ministers were “taking measures to address the problems.”

The reality – highlighted in the report – means there are growing numbers left with no care or having to pay for support themselves.

The report was released on the day the BBC published an online guide to care, which details the costs people face wherever they live in the UK.

Care is means-tested, with only the poorest getting help to pay for services.

 

The Beeb reported (quote):

  • The numbers getting help from their council with care had fallen by 26% to 850,000 in the four years to 2014
  • Spending on care by councils had fallen by 25% in real terms in the five years to 2015, to £5.1bn
  • Additional money from the NHS and increased contributions from individuals had topped this up to £7.2bn, but that still represented a cut of 9%
  • Over 40% of money paid to care homes came from people paying for themselves
  • One million people with care needs now receive no formal or informal help – a rise of 10% in a year

 

The report also warned that the cuts by councils were a risk to the future of the market. I’d say so. It was noted that providers had walked away from council contracts in 59 local authority areas.

I’m not shocked – providers have walked away from contracts in all the West Midlands regions

Older people’s care: It’s where you live that counts and . . . if you’re rich

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Did anyone catch the BBC headlines that said older people are paying the price for cuts to social care?

And the faithful old Beeb added (what so many of us already know), the care and support older people receive increasingly depends on where they live and how much money they have rather than their needs,

Last month a new report by The King’s Fund and the Nuffield Trust laid the facts bare.

Six consecutive years of cuts to local authority budgets, rising demand for services and shortages of staff have left the social care system increasingly unable to meet the needs of the older people who depend on it.

Sadly, the findings also highlight the plight of unpaid carers, saying an unacceptable burden was placed on them. According to the BBC this leaves “rising numbers of older people who have difficulty with the basic activities of daily living – such as washing, dressing and getting out of bed – without any support at all.”

What is happening to us as a society? Mrs Thatcher’s infamous “there is no such thing as society” quote is ringing in my ears.

Evidence is presented that reductions in fees paid by local authorities and other cost pressures such as the National Living Wage are squeezing the incomes of residential and home care providers.

And you’ll never guess . . . it warns that an increasing number of providers are likely to leave the market or go out of business as a result.”

A West Midlands Care Association survey showed that some 50 per cent of home owners were considering selling or closing their businesses. And the picture was not much brighter with the dom-care market with commissioners recognizing there is indded a shortage of community caring.

How have we arrived at this crisis point? I’ll tell you how: Because successive governments have failed to listen to our warnings, and it appears they’re still not listening.

The sum total of what colloquially is known in the Midlands as ‘cocking a deaf ‘un’ is leaving our older citizens without the care they depend on.

The squeeze on the budgets of care providers is also prompting some providers in affluent areas to step back from providing care for people funded by local authorities, leaving those who depend on council funding reliant on an increasingly threadbare safety net.

We have to realise that nearly all private sector providers are running businesses, though it’s my experience that many have charitable hearts and subsequently are managing loss-making care enterprises.

The Beeb also noted: “At the same time, more people are having to pay for their own care as a result of cuts to local authority services.”

Indeed they are.

I cannot recall how many times I’ve spoken of the funding gap between the cost of adequate care and what is paid to my members by local authorities, but catch this . . . “The report highlights a growing funding gap within the existing, inadequate system which will reach at least £2.8 billion by 2019/20 as public spending on adult social care shrinks to less than 1 per cent of GDP. “

There’s a call for the government to be honest, to tell it how it is and if it is unwilling to properly fund and expand the current system, should say so.

Richard Humphries, Assistant Director of Policy at The King’s Fund said is reported online by the BBC as saying: ‘‘The failure of successive governments to reform social care has resulted in a failing system that leaves older people, their families and carers to pick up the pieces. “Putting this right will be a key test of the Prime Minister’s promise of a more equal country that works for everyone – there is no more burning injustice in Britain today than older people being denied the care they need to live with independence and dignity.”

I couldn’t agree more.

 

‘Leak’ reveals a savings solution. Is this really the best we can do?

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My recent weekend off had an annoying surprise. Scanning the newspapers to check essential TV viewing, I find a story about a leaked document that allegedly reveals the government is up for motivating people to save for their care in old age.

Just great. How is that going to help us now?

The leaked memo warns of a looming crisis. Looming? Wake up, it’s already here!

Sir Andrew Dilnot offered his solutions and they’ve been shelved. It appears our current elderly population is being somewhat overlooked in these new proposals (if they’re true).

Observer policy editor Daniel Boffey writes: “Ideas include Isa-style savings accounts – known as “care Isas” – with preferential interest rates for a pot of up to £75,000, which you would be able to withdraw to fund your social care or leave, tax-free, in a will. Another plan is that tax incentives could be offered if people wished to take from their pensions to meet social care costs.”

He goes on to say the memo was written last May by the then pensions minister Baroness Altmann in which it’s claimed she says the crisis has been left too long.

Let me quote some more . . . The memo also warns of huge political risks of allowing the crisis to unfold. “There is no money set aside for social care spending by individuals or by local authorities – needs have to be funded as they arise, and if the money is not there the quality and availability of care is compromised, causing scandals and misery that could potentially rebound on policymakers at some point,” it says.

Word has it the Dilnot proposals are dead in the water and I suspect the care industry as we have known it is too.

A savings solution is for too simplistic in my opinion. Would tax breaks encourage it to work? Only for the well off, I suspect.

Newcomers, who are younger . . . would they buy into it? I doubt it. My friends’ kids are too busy surviving the present and trying to get on the property ladder to have disposable income for their care that appears to them light years away.

If this ‘leak’ is the best offering, I think I need stress counseling or maybe anger management therapy . . .

 

Why this boss is handing contracts back to the LA

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Alan Long is executive director of Mears Group PLC and in the last few months, has taken the “agonising” decisions to hand back a number of homecare contracts to local authorities, especially in the north of England.

In a Guardian article he explains why he felt it necessary to take such action.

The sense of desperation and frustration is tangible. It’s an argument you’ll have heard before . . . currently being considered by our providers in Birmingham and other Midlands areas.

This is what Mr Long writes: “As painful as this has been for the people we have been providing care for – and for our care workers – we hope others will follow our lead and help to end commissioning practices that should have no place in 21st-century Britain.

“Exiting contracts in this way is always the last resort and follows many months of trying to develop a different solution with a commissioner. But, ultimately, it may be the only means to drive the essential change in services that are life-critical to our most vulnerable citizens.

“We are not happy with the disruption this creates, but we feel that we have to take a stand to lead positive change in the absence of leadership from elsewhere.

“The contracts we have exited are those where simple mathematics shows that the charge rate a council wants to pay will result in a provider either not meeting the requirements of the “national living wage” for care staff, or not delivering the service needed by the user.

“In the homecare world, generally, councils only pay for “contact time” – the time a care worker spends with a service user. They don’t pay for the time it takes the worker to get to the property or move on to the next. They don’t pay for any of the time the worker must spend on training, or for the worker’s “on-costs” to ensure they are looked after if they fall sick. Nor do they help pay into their pensions.

“In recent years, councils have also shortened call lengths in order to cut costs, and many people have lost a service altogether.”

Could this be written about any area of the West Midlands and especially in Birmingham where most of our members have already withdrawn their services from the City? I think so.

Business are getting progressively militant it seems as they are driven into impossible corners. I started this post thinking of using just a few comments, but the article makes compelling reading without embellishes from myself.

Mr Long continues: “The “national living wage” is, of course, the bare minimum we need to pay – and rightly so. Being a care worker is an increasingly skilled job, requiring staff who can provide highly intimate personal care as well as support with medication. It is not for the faint-hearted and requires talent, dedication and strength.

“It is no surprise then that there is a national shortage of care staff. In the last 12 months alone, a lack of homecare capacity in the community has caused delayed discharges from hospitals to increase by 40 per cent.

“At a time when the NHS is creaking at the seams, there is an inherent short-sightedness in a system that focuses on cutting support for individuals, reducing call lengths and keeping charge rates for providers below sustainable levels.

“Unfortunately, many care providers still choose to accept very low charge rates from councils. This could be due to a lack of understanding of the minimum wage law, but is often simply caused by local businesses feeling they have no choice but to accept the terms offered, or risk going under. These businesses are often small and rely on a single contract just to exist.

“I have huge sympathy for councils on this issue, especially as many have been forced to cut other services to protect social care budgets. However, there is no excuse for setting charge rates that will almost certainly lead to breaches of the minimum wage or poor service.

“The last few governments have talked about reconsidering how we, as a society, fund social care – but nothing material has happened. Ultimately, this means we are failing to examine how we want to look after older and vulnerable people who need our support. All demographics point to an increasingly elderly population over the next 10 to 20 years, many of whom will be living with multiple long-term conditions. Surely it is a measure of a good society that we provide proper care for those people, at a time when they need it most?”

Mr Long suggests: “If we had given even 1 per cent of the time spent discussing Brexit on trying to reach a solution to the social care crisis, we might have one by now” and majors on the importance of having a sustainable care system.

Mears Group PLC is a major care industry player. Sadly, many of my members are independent, small businesses that do not have the wherewithal to join such a protest.

I fear for our future if we fail to move the hand of this government. I hope sincerely that Mrs May, a self-confessed champion of fairness, gets the message the care sector is sending out and administers fairly over our current needs.

 

New working partnership to help skills shortage . . . and much more

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Creative solutions – a sound bite of the 80s – is alive and ticking with two northern employers coming together to help tackle the care industry skills shortage.

TyneMet College and Age UK North Tyneside’s EveryDay Home Care service have launched a new training programme to upskill workers in the healthcare sector and develop the next generation of industry talent.

I love it!

Health and social care staff from EveryDay Home Care’s workforce and Age UK North Tyneside Wellbeing Services will undergo a structured training programme that covers a range of disciplines including health and safety, medication awareness, customer service, food safety, nutrition and first aid. The employees will study for a health and social care apprenticeship, which will combine on-the-job work experience with classroom learning at TyneMet.

The partnership with TyneMet comes as demand for homecare services is on the rise and providers are struggling to recruit suitably skilled staff.

Alma Caldwell, group chief executive at Age UK North Tyneside and EveryDay Home Care, was reported in the media as saying: “We recognise the importance of increasing the skills base of our workforce, particularly as there is a shortage of suitably qualified workers in our industry.

“That’s why we’ve teamed up with TyneMet College to upskill our current workforce and provide an opportunity for other aspiring care staff to make their way in the sector.”

What can I say? Well, surprisingly quite a bit. . .

All care staff have to go through a structured training programme and many newcomers are signed up to apprenticeship schemes.

My West Midlands Care Association has always worked with local authorities, which have helped us to ensure that we get the right quality training and that it is easyily accessible when needed.

This year we are pushing boundaries and seeking to access training through other routes.

Our problem is that LAs are limited on what they can supply.

Currently we are working with ACCTV a company that produces interactive television training for care staff.

Previously, this has been the preserve of the Southern, well-funded areas, but we have now managed to secure a service with a realistic offer.

Our members will get a very good deal, be assured. Providers will get a taster and access to the dementia training program as September is Dementia Month.

We’ll keep you posted. This is our own creative solution.

 

 

 

Rising cost of care: Don’t shoot the providers, please

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Those people needing to go into a care home now face average fees of £30,000 a year as costs are rising ten times faster than pensioner incomes, writes The Telegraph consumer affairs editor Katie Morley.

A study by Prestige nursing, one of the UK’s biggest care agencies, found a “desperate and worsening” care crisis, with the annual cost of a care home room increasing by £1,536, or 5.2pc over the past year.

The article points out this is almost ten times more than the average £156 (1pc) income gains earned by pensioners over the same period.

Logically then, it suggests that paying for care without spending savings is becoming unaffordable even for the wealthiest pensioners.

Record low interest rates mean pensioners living off cash savings and buying guaranteed incomes in the form of annuities are struggling to generate monies which will not devalue as the price of goods and services gradually rises.

According to the Telegraph “the cost of the average single room in a full-time care home has pushed past £30,000 for the first time and is now £30,926, some £16,470 more than the average pensioner income of £14,456.

“It means pensioners are short by an average of £290 a week if they require residential care,” states the article.

Not surprisingly, the article adds: “London is the region with the most expensive care homes with the average cost now at £38,896 a year. It has overtaken the East of England as the most expensive as a result of experiencing the biggest annual rise in care costs of any UK region at 19pc.”

Before we go any further with this, I must add that every region has a different story to tell on the costs of care, often mirroring the social wealth of the area. We need to be careful how we take up this information and how it is used. For example, in the West Midlands it is more likely to be £24,000 per year, but still many try to provide quality care for less.

Nevertheless, the statistics in the media make compelling reading.

Ros Altmann, the former pensions minister, is quoted in the article, saying: “We have an increasingly desperate crisis in social care in this country. Nobody has set money aside to cover care needs for the increasing numbers of older people who cannot manage to look after themselves.”

Not a lot is made of why we are in this mess in Morley’s work, so I’ll add a nugget or two . . . Simple: Government no longer wants to fund social care in a fair and realistic way. To survive, care providers have to pass on costs. We’re not talking fat cat owners here, either; this is simple economics of survival.

In a separate article carried in the Guardian, Care England, lambasted the government for the crisis in the industry, accusing ministers of not having a strategy for older adult care and allowing local authorities to pay well below the cost of care for residents with state funding.

Martin Green, the chief executive of Care England, is quoted as saying: “I have great sympathy [for residents]. There is a dynamic in this called ageism. Why is it that when you get old and get a disease called dementia, you have to pay for it? I don’t know how in the age of the Equality Act you have older people having to pay for a service that younger people get for free.

“The government needs to have a proper approach to social care. Just pumping money into the NHS isn’t going to work. They need a clear approach, saying that this is what good social care costs. The government needs to show a bit of leadership, I am sick of them hiding behind localism and saying it is about local councils.”

Strong words., which I’d be willing to echo.

There will be those who will blame this current batch of figures on the greed of owners. Frankly, that’s rubbish. It’s just too easy to blame providers when all the facts are not present.

Some local authorities are paying just £330 a week for residents, the equivalent of less than £2 an hour.

Is that a fair rate for caring? Will that really cover hands-on care, laundry costs, food, lighting heating etc? Of course it won’t.

 

 

Social reform: Are the answers in grassroots debate?

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I recently stumbled on an article by Professor Peter Beresford in The Guardian and his comments are worth sharing in this blog.

He is emeritus professor of social policy at Brunel University London, professor of citizen participation at Essex University and co-chair of Shaping Our Lives.

He notes that 70 years on from the creation of the welfare state, social care is one of the biggest, most important and yet most neglected social policies.

“Now another new government needs to face up to the vital need for radical reform,” he adds.

Indeed, that’s so true, but also frustrating. We meet up with Ministers(as we did Paul Burstow in London) and suddenly they are gone – taking with them all the good work we have shared. Such is the political arena.

Prof Beresford’s message is clear – social care reform must come from the grassroots

I quote: “The spending cuts made in the name of austerity over the last six years have especially hit local authority social care.

“This in turn has particularly hurt the growing numbers of older and disabled people needing help, including mental health service users and people with learning difficulties. While the rhetoric surrounding social care has been all about integration, the tendency is still to treat it in isolation.”

This is someone who has a good handle on the underlying issues of funding – the root of nearly all social care ills – and the frustration we feel in trying to get joined-up thinking between the NHS and residential and domiciliary care.

He observes what he describes as the “grassroots reality which shows the human face of welfare reform like that presented by Ken Loach’s award-winning film I, Daniel Blake.”

Based on research and interviews by the screenwriter Paul Laverty, this movie tells the fictional story of Daniel Blake, a middle-aged widower in the North East who can’t work or get benefits after a near-fatal heart attack.

The internet trailer is challenging and introduced for me a broader horizon of how ‘The Cuts’ – ‘Austerity Measures’ – call it what you will – have impacted our lives and how food banks have become ‘normal’ in an increasing desensitised society.

I find myself questioning: What is social care coming to? How has this been allowed to happen and what more can I do to help educate those who handle the finances of Government and seem unable to find funds for us.

Prof Beresford is the author of a new participatory social policy text, All Our Welfare, and he highlighted that there really are alternatives, both to old-style welfare state and current “neoliberal privatising welfare” reform.

Interesting – mental note; must find out more!

David Brindle, the Guardian’s public service editor who chaired an All Our Welfare launch debate, referred to the post-war welfare state as a revolution and asked what kind of revolution we need now.

On the panel, John McDonnell, shadow chancellor, emphasised the importance of developing a new narrative for a new welfare state, reminding us that its founders not only created a new architecture, but also “won the argument” so that for years Conservative governments continued to protect it.

“It’s narrative that wins,” he said.

Significantly, this was a different kind of debate because it included the groups more often talked about than having a chance to do the talking. Representatives of Disabled People Against Cuts, Shaping Our Lives, other disabled people’s and service user organisations, campaigners and user researchers, were present in force as well as the policymakers, academics and researchers more often encountered.

Is this the way we must go?

Summing up, the professor writes: “This was one occasion that demonstrated that there are very different ideas out there about a future for social care and welfare, which come from the bottom up. But they tend to be hidden or devalued and we need foster these green shoots. This is perhaps already beginning to happen. . . .

“For me, the key question posed by writing All Our Welfare was, how should people look after each other in a 21st century society? The launch debate showed that there are already many answers in the making – if they are only allowed space to surface.”

Wish I could have been there . . .

 

Exceptional success at the double for care workers

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Brum care awards

Above: Nicholas Nolan and Cherry Harvey, centre, with ITV weather presenter Emma Jesson, left, and Jag Khatkar

 

Many of us in the care sector recently attended a glittering evening to celebrate the best of caring at the Edgbaston Cricket Ground. It was a great night that celebrated excellence in care and a night I was pleased for West Midlands Care Association to be part of.

Out of that event, one story has been prominent in my mind. Two newcomers to the care sector were honoured with an industry award for their outstanding commitment to the job after judges failed to decide on a clear winner.

The selection panel was so impressed with the nominations for support worker Cherry Harvey and community carer Nicolas Nolan it decided they both deserved the Exceptional Newcomer’s Award. The couple were shortlisted from hundreds of entrant across the city for the Birmingham Care Awards.

Support worker Cherry, who is part of the Precious Homes’ Kings Heath team in Birmingham, had no idea she had been nominated and was thrilled when her name was called out.

Judges commended Cherry’s dedication, commitment, compassion and loyalty, specifically in a first-time role within the care sector.

The awards ceremony was a joint venture between Birmingham City Council, West Midlands Care Association, Skills for Care and the Care Consortium. A regional event, its aim was to celebrate and reward excellence in social care.

Joint winner Nicolas, a community worker with Trident Reach The People’s Charity, caught the judges’ attention for his “rapid learning ability and willingness to better himself.”

With no previous domiciliary care experience, he joined Trident’s Birmingham Home Care team based on Hagley Road, Edgbaston, in January.

Already he handles a customer base of varying needs, working alongside people with learning disabilities, mental health issues and the physically disabled.

His award nomination said: “Nicholas’s understanding of all his customer needs and the nature of how domiciliary care services work is highly admirable, given he started with no care experience. He is a valuable member of the service who is always willing to help customers achieve, always puts customers first and applies a personalised approach to every customer he works with.”

This pair represent everything what good care is about and I thoroughly endorse the decision that both have been declared winners. Birmingham Care Awards is about celebrating care excellence.

They are the kind of role models the industry needs and proof that quality care is out there, valued and right on our doorstep.