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By Debbie le Quesne

As the Red Cross intervene with the NHS, what will it take force a social care lifeline?

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The other Saturday I watched the television news with a stunned sense of disbelief as the chief executive of the British Red Cross announced the NHS was in the middle of a “humanitarian crisis”.

I’d never thought of the Red Cross intervening in UK affairs in such a way – don’t the images of this worthy, brave orgaisation invade our news from far flung places where there’s famine and the ravages of conflict? Not any more it seems.

To hear its top man, Mike Adamson, explaining exactly what defines a humanitarian crisis and that it’s is now in England, stopped me in my tracks.

His definition was along the lines of . . .

“It affects many people over a prolonged period of time, something of threat to their health or wellbeing. Just think about the situation of someone, for example, waiting on a trolley in and A&E department for several hours, perhaps with no family around them after a fall, probably quite frightened. . . .”

The warning came as it emerged two patients died in the same A&E department within a week during “extremely busy” periods.

In December A&E department shut their doors 140 times and now cancer ops are being cancelled, I read in the newspapers.

Mr Adamson added extra cash was needed for health and social care to make the system sustainable.

What was that? Extra cash for social care. Indeed!

Sadly, at the root of the NHS crisis is a failing social care . . . and we have warned for years that it was terribly broken. They would not listen, and I’m not convinced they are listening now.

The official response from the NHS is predictable: What crisis? And this still remains the official line.

I find it odd that hospitals like Russells Hall, Dudley, is allegedly paying a company to try to help sort out their funding, either by pressurising care homes to drop their fees, or getting patients’ families to become fiscally involved. Surely this could never catch on after the government’s stalled attempt to get the public to invest in care insurance policies. The elephant in the room, of course, is a properly functioning social care system. Everyone knows it. The government, however, steadfastly refuses to acknowledge it.

Mr Adamson explained: “The British Red Cross is on the front line, responding to the humanitarian crisis in our hospital and ambulance services across the country.

“We have been called in to support the NHS and help get people home from hospital and free up much needed beds.” Called in by whom? I suspect the Department of Health.

Shadow health secretary Jonathan Ashworth said it was “staggering” that the Red Cross had been drafted in to help. I think so too, though I would add that his Government did precious little to grasp the nettle of social care during its term.

Of course, there’s much politicking to be had over this development in the care saga so we need to focus on facts.

Just about a year ago bed blocking was costing the NHS about £820 million per year.

Last summer the National Audit Office said delays in discharging patients from hospitals in England had risen by nearly a third over two years. Delayed transfers (bed blocking) have not improved and there’s a resigned approach that’s punching through that deeply disturbs me.

Across England, the audit office found that for every 100 beds, three days of use were taken by patients who no longer needed to be in hospital between March 2015 and February 2016.

Quite what 2017 analytics will deliver terrifies me, because it is in direct correlation to the ability of social care to unblock beds – something it can no longer do. And we all know the reasons why.

The question now is this: Exactly what will it take for the Government to intervene? Will it deliver the much-needed financial lifeline to social care, which could not only rescue struggling care providers, but also our hospitals and . . . dare I say, those people who need either one or both of those services,

 

 

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