wmcha

By Debbie le Quesne

leave a comment »

Smart thinking, but ‘care bots’ can’t replace carers

Creating the ideal home is big business – in fact there’s a world stage out there for exhibitions that can both temp and puzzle. From the practical to the bizarre the evolution to help make us more efficient is rolling out rapidly.

In the home of tomorrow our front doors will be able to ‘talk’ to your smoke alarm, lights will flash when the fridge door is left open and, according to reports emerging from the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Teddy will put your child to bed.

Other features include at smart lock that unlocks the front door when the home owner is near, televisions that show notifications and can warn when a child is using the web when they should be asleep, and a system that lets you change all the clocks in your home at the touch of a button.

The vision of the future is restrained only by our imagination.

But this model, that’s also invading the care sector, is not without some serious pitfalls, as reported in the Telegraph online by Science Editor Sarah Knapton.

Last month’s article said these so-called ‘care-bots’ are “emotionally dangerous”. The warning comes from an artificial intelligence boffin Maggie Boden, professor of Cognitive Science at the University of Sussex.

She warned that machines would never be able to understand abstract ideas such as loyalty or hurt – essential in responding compassionately to those needing care.

“Computer companions worry me very much,” Prof Boden was reported as saying.

I understand her concerns, but one does not have to be a professor to comprehend that the elderly really do need real people to respond to their needs.

I read that last December the University of Singapore introduced “Nadine” the ‘care bot’, who, according to its manufacturers, will eventually provide childcare and offer friendship to lonely pensioners.

For those who know the care business well, loyalty from careers to their patients is something that is hugely appreciated by those receiving and those managing care. All excellent care on a personal level will have loyalty as a cornerstone.

I really don’t think ‘care bots’ can replicate that just yet, and even if they could, would I want to confide in a machine? Of course not.

Technology has its place and, fortunately I’m not one of those afraid of it. Telecare is a prime example where technology in the care sector can be helpful. It has been designed for people with social care needs and allows the remote monitoring of an individual’s condition or lifestyle. It aims to manage the risks of independent living and can include automatic movement sensors, falls sensors, and bed occupancy sensors.

But computer companions are very different. The simple act of sharing a cup of tea or listening to an elderly persons’s story can never be replicated by ‘bot’ science – well, at least not yet. Humans not only respond (we’re aware computers can do this too), but can respond in an appropriate emotional way (and it’s where, critically, the care-bots fail).

Smart technological thinking can help with being creative on stretched budgets, but even with all our faults, cannot replace that which makes us quintessentially human.

A robotic revolution to replace carers . . . Not on my watch.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: