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By Debbie le Quesne

Ombusdsman’s fees report: Providers are not the villain of the piece

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The cost of care is always going to be a hot potato. For a start, many people wrongly think it should always be wholly funded by local authorities and then, of course, there’s a whole load of confusion over fees.

Enter the faithful BBC with its story that families are paying too much for care in England “all too often” . . . because of confusing or incorrect information from councils.

That’s the verdict of the Local Government Ombudsman, which noted that some people were not offered an affordable care option in their area.

It said: “The decision to place a loved one in a care home can be one of the hardest any family has to make, but all too often families are paying too much for their care because they are not getting the correct, timely information.”

Thrown into the mix are top-up fees, one of the main reasons confusion exists, according to Andrew Kaye, from the charity Independent Age.

Care England says top-up fees are helping to mask a funding crisis in social care, with some of the poorest people and their families being asked to fill holes in the budgets of local authorities. I agree, but must add that this is the only way many care businesses are able to survive in these difficult times.

The moral argument will doubtless run and run, but the fact remains until such times council fees paid equal the realistic cost of care I see little changing.

In addressing the moral high ground critics, I would ask them to consider what options there would be for non-top-up residents if homes closed because such fees were not levied.

It really would not take much to push so many of our providers into an economic tailspin.

Professor Martin Green, of Care England, argues care should be available “at a cost which the local authority should be happy to pay.”

Of course that should be the case. It’s important, however, that care providers are not seen as the villain of the piece here.

Central Government with its sweeping fiscal restraint within the care sector has forced councils and the care marketplace into a dire corner, the likes which I have never seen. Mr Cameron and his cohorts clearly know of our crisis and the fact local authorities are between a rock and hard place, They could and should bring it to an end.

Ring-fenced social care monies . . . etc, etc. . .

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