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By Debbie le Quesne

Global trend on care not a good one to follow

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In 1969 (too many years ago for me to remember, of course) Mick Jagger strutted onto the stage at Hyde Park wearing a white dress.

Our  parents asked: What is the world coming to? They were both shocked and challenged by what they saw as the Rolling Stones performed their concert.

Today, I’m asking the same question as I read that more than half the world’s elderly lack access to long-term care, though sadly the news doesn’t appear to warrant the same media interest as that legendary 60s’ moment.

The data has been produced by the International Labour Organisation which condemns the “deplorable” situation facing rapidly ageing populations.

A new report from the United Nations agency shows that some 300 million people over the age of 65 cannot easily access long-term care when needed.

The report comes just days after America announced an army of carers aged 75 and over was growing daily and now constitute seven per cent of those who provide unpaid care to a relative or friend, the survey found.

We face a global problem and I’m stunned to learn that the world’s most “generous” countries, found in Europe, spend only two per cent or less of their GDP on long-term care.

It’s cold comfort, I know, given the troubles in our industry, but in comparison to some nations the UK care deals are pretty good.

We have, however, an awesome responsibility to preserved what we have. Reading an article in the New York Times of how a 75-year-old shoulders the role of caring for her immobile husband without a care package makes me all the more determined to fight tooth and nail to ensure care providers get enough resources to do their job properly.

The fact care, as we have known it, is under threat and the changes being forced by market manipulation are not in the best interests of clients of providers.

We need to remain vigilant that long-term care indeed stays accessible to our elderly, sick and frail and does not become another ‘inevitable victim’ of austerity measures. The global trend, if we believe all these figures, is not a good one to follow.

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