wmcha

By Debbie le Quesne

A ‘deepening crisis’ but where is the antidote?

leave a comment »

Like over-prescribed antibiotics, graphic descriptions of the current care crisis fail to have the desired effect when they become a daily prescription of the news.

I fear many are becoming anaesthetised – indeed, almost indifferent – to the digest of chaos emerging from the sector.

In a joint submission to the Treasury ahead of November’s Spending Review, 20 organisations say the care sector is facing a “deepening crisis”.

Yes, it surely is!

They have called for funding to councils to be protected, as is happening with the NHS, a move that my own WMCA has also taken.

Ministers said investment in health would also benefit the care sector.

The government has pointed out that plans were being put in place to ensure greater joint working between the two sectors and that would relieve some of the pressures.

But those putting their names to the latest warning – leaders of councils, the NHS, care providers and charities – are not convinced the future is safe.

They say the market is “fragile” with councils forced to keep fees low and providers leaving the care sector; this, they add is driving up prices for those who fund themselves and leading to fewer people getting state-funded support.

Let me quote The Guardian piece: “While the government has pledged an extra £8bn a year for the NHS by 2020, social care has received no such assurances.”

Ray James, president of the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, one of the signatories to the submission, is reported as saying: “It is vitally important that this year’s Spending Review understands the importance of our services to vulnerable people,” adding that the “near-certainty” is that without adequate and sustained finances the ability to carry out their duties will be in jeopardy.

The Care Providers Alliance, adds that the challenges are on an “unprecedented scale,” while Rob Webster, chief executive of the NHS Confederation, which represents health service managers, says: “Having a shiny NHS cog will be no good in a broken health and care machine.

“All these services are interconnected and all need greater financial certainty.”

I’d like to know who the other signatories are, but I think we get the message anyway. . . let’s hope those with real influence for change also do.

We have heard so much now of impending doom, I fear our message is in danger of becoming white noise. Prescribing the antidote when the patient is dead presents an obvious problem.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: