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By Debbie le Quesne

Adult social care a human necessity

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Has anyone noticed that it’s gone spookily quiet on issues relating to the ‘single pot’ budget response to the NHS and social care?

Before the election there appeared to be good display of headlines and news bulletins on this initiative, but now: Silence.

Perhaps I have selective deafness, but if I have the condition is share by Zoe Williams writing in The Guardian.

She too, has picked up the vibes of change, observing that although the care sector was “beset with injustices, and the NHS was often having to fill cracks at vast and unnecessary expense, and services would have to be joined up if they were ever to work,” the tone for public consumption is different now.

Andrea Sutcliffe, the chief inspector of adult social care, has described a sector “under stress and strain” in which an ageing population with increasingly complex needs was “only half the story.” Really!

Regulators receive more than 150 allegations of abuse of the elderly every day, Williams reports. Quoting the response from a department of health spokesperson . . . “Treating somebody with dignity and compassion doesn’t cost anything.” But it does, a point Williams also makes.

The language of compassion, she writes, involves funding care and wages and conditions and so on.

As much as £4.6bn has been cut from social care budgets over the past five years, I read. I’d hoped that the current shortfall might be made good with a single NHS/social care fund, despite misgivings over its administration.

Where has news on the single fund gone? Adult social care is not a bolt-on option. It is a human necessity.

In February Greater Manchester and the NHS announced plans around the future of health and social care with a signed memorandum agreeing to bring together health and social care budgets – a combined sum of £6bn.

The scheme saw NHS England, 12 NHS Clinical Commissioning Groups, 15 NHS providers and 10 local authorities agree a framework for health and social care.

My question: After such a trailblazing start to the initiative, what is happening in the rest of UK, and of course, more specifically, the Midlands?

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