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By Debbie le Quesne

Change is paramount if adequate social care is to continue

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Local authorities are assuming significant reductions in social care budgets. They’re also assuming the cuts will be “ongoing”. Just what I want to hear (not).

The recent ADASS Budget Survey 2015 report shows that this year, as last, 35 per cent of council budgets relate to adult social care. Councils, ADASS notes, have tried to protect social care spending at the cost of other services but are running out of ability to do this in the future. I believe this to be true in many instances.

The report goes on to says that In the context of the NHS, health funding has increased from £97.5billion in 201-11 to £116.4billion in 2015-16, an increase of 19.3per cent. Over the same period, social care funding has decreased from £14.9billion to £13.3billion, a reduction of 10.7 per cent and “more in real terms when demography is taken into account.”

Significantly, “the money being transferred from the NHS is not enough to mitigate these spending reductions.”

This surely must be in the ears of David Cameron.

Senior NHS leaders have already publically shared concerns about the funding for social care services to support people in greatest need. They have added their voices to a growing chorus of concerns over the much-heralded £8 billion NHS funding gap figure that’s being forecast.

In an open letter to the Prime Minister, the NHS Confederation said in May 2015:

“Our deep concern over social care funding must be addressed if we are to meet people’s needs, never mind the impact that social care has on the ability of the NHS to provide safe, quality and timely treatment to those who need it.”

I applaud the fact that ADASS wants to see a social care system that is protected, aligned and re-designed.

To achieve this, ADASS is calling upon the Government to urgently ensure that social care funding is protected and aligned with the NHS, including making provision for the social care funding gap alongside the funding gap for the NHS.

This is brave, campaigning talk and I wish every success on those who are left to do the hand-to-hand fighting in Parliament.

ADASS concludes by saying: “This is paramount to securing adequate health and wellbeing outcomes for individuals and their carers and to ensuring that councils do not run out of money.”

The truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth . . . I really do hope that this latest document, which shows a falling barometer on the state of the nation’s care, will impact the decision makers to reassess the austerity course we are on – and particularly how it impacts our most vulnerable people.

Should social care survive this ordeal by fire, should the good times ever roll again for care providers, should there ever be a season of plenty, perhaps local authorities could not be so eager to financially squeeze care businesses, thus allowing reserves to build for such a time that we might just have to navigate this way once again.

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