wmcha

By Debbie le Quesne

CQC new regime: The good, the bad and the ugly

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First the good news: The Care Quality Commission has found “many examples of good and outstanding care” using their new inspection criteria.

And now the bad: As the expert-led inspection model rolls out the regulator is discovering wide and “unacceptable” variations in quality.

The tougher approach also discovered that there are not just big differences in the quality of care that people experience from different providers, in different places but also sometimes at different times of the day or day of the week.

The five-question approach – are they safe, are they effective, are they caring, are they responsive to people’s needs and are they well led? – is bound to bring change to existing ratings and perhaps the findings with a sample of NHS trusts will be mirrored in our care and nursing homes.

In an article on the CQC website, the regulatory body says: “We began applying our new inspection approach to NHS trusts in September 2013. We’ve seen some outstanding care – but we’ve also seen examples of care that requires improvement or that’s inadequate. We have found differences in quality from one trust to another, from hospital to hospital within trusts, and between different services within hospitals.”

Some 38 NHS acute trusts were checked by the end of August 2014; nine achieved an overall rating of good, 24 were rated requires improvement and five trusts were rated inadequate.

Stating the obvious, CQC says good leadership drives up quality and safety overall.

But as CQC “calls time” on unacceptable variation in the quality of care and higher the bar for providers, my fear that you get what you pay for remains.

Indeed, I cannot think of a single WMCA member who does not want excellence in their service, but how, tell me how, are we supposed to achieve such glorious goals when there’s such a tight hold on local authority purse strings for bed purchases?

I applaud the sentiment of the Commission to empower consumers to use CQC’s inspection reports and ratings to make decisions on care choice. I also believe in their advice that “providers of poor care need to look at those who are doing it well and learn from them.”

Quality, however, always has a cost – an ugly word, I know – and I’m let pondering once again where the finance will come from to meet the new CQC inspection challenges

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