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By Debbie le Quesne

King’s Fund sound alarm over shortfall in care funding

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Budget cuts of 26 percent will threaten the sustainability of social care the Association of Directors of Adult Social Service warned.

As I have previously blogged the organisation said the results of the annual budget survey show that while spending on adult services has reduced by 12 per cent since 2010, the amount of people needing support has increased by 14 per cent.

Put simply, the figures don’t stack up and councils have had to make savings equivalent to £3.53bn. David Pearson, president of ADASS, was quoted in The Guardian as saying: “As resources reduce and need increases, directors are increasingly concerned about the impact on countless vulnerable people who will fail to receive, or not be able to afford, the social care services they need and deserve.”

The warning has drawn comments from Richard Humphries, assistant director of policy at the King’s Fund: Again quoted in the Guardian online, he says: “This survey once again highlights the enormous pressure on social care budgets.

“Despite the best efforts of local authorities, this will result in further cuts to services and fewer people receiving support.

“Worryingly, half the money being transferred from the NHS budget to support better joint working between health and social care is now being spent on protecting social care services from budget cuts, rather than driving integrated care and other service changes needed to better meet the needs of patients and service-users.”

I would dearly like to bring some positive, creative solution to this ongoing debate, but frankly like so many in the care sector, my day of making savings through working smarter is nearly through. Everyone I know has cut, restructured, re-invented and re-thought the way they work to deliver more efficient care. There has to come an end – it’s an inevitable economic principle – when the wheels will finally drop off social care machine.

The King’s Fund embraces some of the finest minds in the country and the government would do well to heed the alarms.

The only real lifeline we have is the new Care Act and the Better Care Fund that focus resources to help manage their own care and hopefully save billions. Critically, however, we need monies to roll out the new working methodology – cash, it appears that is already spent on “protecting social care services from budget cuts.”

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